Things I Have Done Today

  1. Had a briefing meeting about installing PC’s over a coffee at 7.30am.
  2. Met with a supplier’s new manager.
  3. Explained the difference between staff and public computers.
  4. Took someone on a tour through the library site and shown them all of the technology I am responsible for making happen.
  5. Explaining why we have things like Foxtel (Pay TV), X-Boxes and HD-TV in libraries.
  6. Tried to get a new computer build created STAT.
  7. Explained why it is important for the new library to be created as a “site” in our computer system.
  8. Measured joinery ready for a cabinet to be installed.
  9. Demonstrated where cabling for Foxtel is installed through the ceiling.
  10. Tried to find out how wall decals are installed and how long it will take for them to be dry/ready so I can work around them.
  11. Learnt how a PA system works, and what kind of cabling it requires if it has to be cabled more than 15 metres.
  12. Decided where the PA system point will be.
  13. Learnt how a video intercom works.
  14. Explained to someone how a hearing loop works, and what the current Queensland law for hearing loops in public buildings entails.
  15. Learnt how to shut down COMMS boards and why I would need to do so.
  16. Decided on where Foxtel decoder boxes should be mounted.
  17. Designed an ergonomics system for an entire library.
  18. Learned what Corian is, and how you need to cut it or drill holes in it.
  19. Measured desks to sink holes for cables and bolts to go into them.
  20. Finally got to go to the ladies room and grab a drink of water.
  21. Logged on a brand new PC ready to add software and configure it.
  22. Walked away from PC to demonstrate how a desk will be set up ergonomically.
  23. Met with a Self Checkout machine supplier to show him where the new machines will go, and explained how they fit in with other furniture.
  24. Showed an electrician where power and data points were to go and explained the difference between public and staff data points.
  25. Inspected a credenza and how it fits against a wall and where it’s cabling goes.
  26. Showed someone an AV rack, explained each component in it, how it was cabled and what the man sitting in the corner near it with a laptop was doing.
  27. Demonstrated the trompe l’oeil effect of mounting projector screens with different ceiling heights.
  28. Sat down at that brand new PC again, partially installed one piece of software.
  29. Had to run and find the joinery fitter and work out when I can get joinery cut.
  30. Showed two staff how to use the payroll system.
  31. Tried to finish installing that software.
  32. Answered a phone call about ergonomics.
  33. Discussed lighting levels and acoustics.
  34. Was shown a very expensive piece of equipment and now I’ve forgotten what it does.
  35. Managed a complaint about builders leaving half eaten food (noodles) in the middle of sites for 3 days.
  36. Finally got that software installed.
  37. Called three people getting information for an electrician.
  38. Tried to start configuring the PC again.
  39. Ran downstairs to bring someone into the building site.
  40. FINALLY finished that first PC, rebooted it and logged it in ready for the staff to use!
  41. Decided it was time for a break.  Ducked downstairs to a cafe and hid in a corner for 10 minutes with a coffee and some pecan pie, just trying to get my brain back into order.
  42. Answered my phone twice.
  43. Ran back upstairs because someone was looking for me about something in the office next door to the library.
  44. Logged on a second PC to install software and configure it.
  45. Was asked for a DVD to test some equipment.  Thankfully I just HAPPENED to have one in my backpack.
  46. Hung around to watch the equipment being tested, because I’ve worked so hard to get it happening and it’s so lovely I wanted to see.
  47. The first words that came across from the DVD player from a Frasier DVD were “Is this thing on?”  Weird!
  48. Was informed a desk was the wrong design.
  49. Told informer to go away and let me think about it.
  50. Answered my phone again.  Told caller to email me whatever they needed and I’d make it happen… somehow.
  51. Went through a delivery docket with hundreds of pieces of equipment on it and worked out if every piece was there.
  52. Went and looked at desk.  It doesn’t fit.
  53. Freaked out a bit.
  54. Tried to get more software and config done on that second PC.
  55. Decided it would be a good idea to photograph everything I’m doing to document it.
  56. Ran around photographing everything.
  57. Called the boss about the stupid desk.
  58. Solved a problem with networked drives.
  59. Talked to the head builder about all the things we’re trying to get done in the next week.
  60. Tried to find the joinery dudes again.
  61. Sent my two IT techs away for the day, they’d done all they could.
  62. Decided to experiment with the desk.  Asked for volunteers, took photos of the desk with two lady librarians sitting at it.
  63. Went back to that second PC and finally got it finished.
  64. Realised that I needed to measure burly blokes on that desk.
  65. Rounded up the two tallest, broadest shouldered blokes on site and made them model for demonstrative photographs at the desk.
  66. Laughed.  A lot.
  67. Realised I was still carrying a large bolt in my pocket.
  68. Decided at 1.45pm that I was STARVING and needed some space.
  69. Went and got lunch, and was sitting in a corner sending text message photos of the desk with aforementioned burly blokes modelling to the boss when a colleague and an IT manager plonked themselves down with me.
  70. Lunch became a meeting.
  71. Went back to the site.  Gave up on trying to install software and configure PC’s.
  72. Had another run through of the AV.  The AMX programming is coming along nicely, and now the lovely motorised screens go up and down, projectors running, DVD players in, two out of three touch panels installed and looking amazing.
  73. Head builder told us they were turning the power off on us in 5 minutes.
  74. Updated the library TL on progress.
  75. Discussed further requirements with IT manager.
  76. Came home.
  77. Spent 2 hours on emails dealing with “normal” work.
  78. Realised I have to do something similar all day tomorrow.

I AM A LIBRARIAN!!!

Why the hell am I doing all of the above?

Because I love it.  I love technology.  I love working with builders and techies and tradies.  Because I run around a building site in lipstick and hot pink pigtails with all of these burly blokes and laugh and have fun despite the frustration and stress, and enjoy the ever changing task list and environment.  Because I believe in what I do, and I do it for the people of my city/community.

And because I’m bloody good at it!

PS. Operation Baldy is up to $467!!  Almost to the halfway point.  For an update, click here.

December 2, 2010. about me, AV, blokes, computers, humour, IT, laughs, librarians, libraries, organisation, responsibility, technology. 2 comments.

Big 50 Volume 9: My Current Job

I love my job.  I really do.  Sometimes little things drive me up the wall, but I wouldn’t be a human being if that didn’t happen.  But at the crux of it all, I love my job and am passionate about what I do.

I am an IT librarian.  When I tell people I’m an IT librarian, they instantly assume I work in a library, but I actually work in an office.  I do get to visit libraries though.  I work in a support team for 32 libraries (soon to be 33), one mobile library, one city archive and of course our own office.  Many people assume that librarian is a very generalised role, but not in many cases.  While most of us are good Jack/Jill-of-all-trades types, we often have very definite areas of specialisation that we are passionate about.  It never ceases to amaze me when I realise that someone is surprised that I or my librarian colleagues are very knowledgeable about things that are way outside of the librarian stereotype.

Initially I wanted to work in libraries because of my passion for reading and books.  But over the years, while those passions have never left me, my passion for libraries is about so much more.  Reading, particularly recreational reading, is still at the core of why my job is important to me, but that core has expanded to include literacy, critical thinking, access to information, education (especially life-long learning), community, social inclusion and equity.  Add that to a healthy passion for my home city, and I’m in a career I always feel like I can really get my teeth into and be challenged by.

When I first started in the job I am in now, 9 years ago, I mostly catalogued photographs of Brisbane all day.  I did have some support role in IT, but predominantly I spent my time working on digitising and cataloguing the photographic collection.  Over time my role has evolved (and I’ve been promoted within the same position) to a much more varied scope.  Nowdays my areas of specialty are library IT asset procurement and management,  AV in libraries, social media in libraries and special equipment in libraries.  So from sourcing and purchasing computers, printers, projectors, LCD/Plasma screens, audio equipment, AV system management equipment, cameras, iPads, eBook readers, game consoles, DVD players, television/Pay-TV resources, and any other doohicky or gadget that crops up as relevant/useful/required by libraries, to managing the installation of all of that, staff training for it all, and then asset management so that we know where all of that equipment is at any given time, what it’s worth, whether or not it’s working, if it needs repairs, when it’s time to replace it and what to do with it when it needs disposing of through to training staff in how to deliver all of that stuff to our customers, I’m kept pretty damn busy and challenged all of my working life.

At the moment we’re at the pointy end of building one new library (due to open in December) and relocating one rather large library to a temporary location (for 18 months or so) so that a fancy pants new version can be built for them to go to in the long term.  We don’t do projects this big very often, but when we do… boy, do they take over your life.  And now more than ever, are we, the librarians, being called on to do so much of the planning, research, project management, implementations, installations, trouble-shooting, crisis averting, shiny-making, and overall nitty-grittying of these big projects.  It’s AWESOME that we’re so much part of the creation of our own libraries, but it’s damn hard work and you have to learn so much, and think on your feet all the time.

ALL the time.  Two nights ago I woke at 3am shouting the name of the relocating library into the darkness.  That’s how much it takes over your life.

But I love it.  It means a lot to me.  It’s far more than a job.  It’s a vocation, a calling.  It matters.  And my contribution makes a difference.

November 10, 2010. Big 50, librarians, libraries, work. 6 comments.

A library should be like a pair of open arms.

I’ve been sick most of this week.  It’s summer, it does it to me almost every year, exacerbates a chronic health condition and makes me pretty miserable.  But I’m on the upswing finally and hopefully that’s the worst of it for this summer.

I was emailed the other day asking about a post I did back when I was on Blogger, about why I became a librarian.  It’s still there, both on that blog and in the archives of this one, but as it’s one that I get almost no hits on here, but a stack on the old site, I thought I’d re-post it in a fresh new post here, so it was easier to find, and is this nicer format.

I also found the lovely quote that is the title of this post, which I just had to use.  I found it on Tumblr and it is attributed to a Roger Rosenblatt, who I know nothing about, but shall be Googling shortly!

So without any further ado, here is the story of why I became a librarian:

Why I Became a Librarian

A couple of days ago I was having a conversation with a friend about my boss and why I admire her, and I said something about “She reminds me of why I am a librarian and am passionate about libraries.” He asked me exactly why I am a librarian and as I thought of my answer, I decided that perhaps a blog post could come of that.

So…. why am I a librarian?

Well, when I was a little girl, the library was always a haven for me. It’s no secret that I come from a pretty screwed up family. Things at home were usually pretty crap. So when we used to go to the library of a night time. I think it was Tuesday nights the library was open late in Rosewood. We’d go in our pj’s and I had that whole building full of books at my fingertips, I was happy.

My school teacher-librarian when I was little was a lovely lady named Miss Stubbs. I thought she was amazing. She was pretty and had long straight blonde hair, and read books to kids at her job. She had a soft, clear voice and a sweet smile. And she was always really gentle and nice to me.

I remember her encouraging me to choose anything I wanted from the library to read. Even when I sometimes chose a book that was too young for me, or that I’d read time and time again, she never suggested I should choose something else. Sometimes she asked me what I liked about that particular book, and would offer something else that I might like for the same reasons.

She was usually right.

When I returned books, she would ask me what I thought about it. She never judged me if I didn’t like something that she had recommended, or if I liked it for silly reasons, like it was funny or it had rude characters in it. I loved Roald Dahl’s books for the naughtiness of some of his characters. There was a Robyn Klein book called Penny Pollard’s Diary that looked like an exercise book and like it had bandaids and polaroids and stuff all stuck in it. It looked all dirty and Penny Pollard was a bit of a naughty girl. Miss Stubbs thought it was totally OK that I loved that book, even though my mother thought it was stupid.

Miss Stubbs used to let me look in the box of new books first when they arrived, because I’d read pretty much everything in the library. I always remember it being like Christmas when those boxes would appear, it wasn’t very often from memory, but there were always new friends in that box for me.

Whenever things were really bad at home, there was always a book to escape into. I could hide in my wardrobe with a torch and read whatever library books I had. Sometimes I would find a corner down in our yard, far away from the house, where I could read or just daydream my own stories. There was a jacaranda tree I would climb up and read in too. When I was a little older, I would get on my bike and ride across town to my school and I would go to the library. If it was closed, I would sit on the sort of verandah outside in the shade and read there. It was always so peaceful and calm there, compared to at home.

A few years ago, I was standing in line at a Michael Palin booksigning, when I thought I recognised the lady in front of me. I couldn’t quite place where, but she turned and said to me “Excuse me, is your name Kathleen?” The minute she spoke, I recognised that soft, clear voice. It was Miss Stubbs. I was thrilled to tell her that I was now a librarian, and almost totally because of her. I found that she was still a children’s librarian in the area where I grew up, and still passionate about her job. I’m not quite sure she knows how much she meant to me, either then or now.

After Miss Stubbs left our school, I was a little older, and the new teacher-librarian came along. Her name was Miss Browning. She was really cool. She was more extroverted than Miss Stubbs, and had a fat red cattle dog called Bear that used to sleep around the library. Miss Browning let me help out at the library a lot. Especially when there were bullies around. I would shelve for her, or get things ready for her classes. She was always so funny, and I remember laughing with her while we talked. She taught me to cover and mend books, as well as how to catalogue. I already knew Dewey really well when I got to High School because of her. She gave me a t-shirt with sunglasses on it once, and I wore that thing to rags.

I often wonder what happened to her.

Once I got to High School, the librarian was Mrs Scott. Or Ms Whittaker. Or was that the other way around? Mrs Whittaker/Ms Scott. I remember she changed her name while we were there, because she got divorced. At first she really scared me, because while she was only a little lady and I was already my adult height, she had this ENORMOUS voice. She shouted at the boys a lot. Miss Stubbs and Miss Browning never shouted.

But one night I went to the library after school (again, they opened it one night per week to the public) and I asked her timidly if there were any books like the one I had read, The Root Cellar by Janet Lunn. You see I really loved the American Civil War setting, and wanted to read more about it. She gave me The Red Badge of Courage by Stephen Crane. We were firm friends from that day on.

She too would let me help in the library during lunch time and after school, mostly to keep away from the bullies and avoid going home. Later the school built a fantastic new library, state-of-the-art with one of the first fully automated barcoding systems in Australia. She bought badges for me and two other girls that said “Library Monitor”. Nobody had them before that. She taught us how to use the barcoding system, which had a pen shaped barcode reader. She taught me more about cataloguing and processing books. I could cover hardcover books with the thick plastic covering like a pro. I still can do it, beautifully neat and perfect.

And she encouraged me to read anything I could get my hands on. She had travelled a lot, and she told me about places she had been and things she had done, and gave me books to read about those places. Once she went on a big world trip and we had a substitute teacher-librarian. She sent me three postcards while she was away, to my house. I felt so special that she sent them to my house, not to the school like the ones she sent to the teacher’s aide that worked in the library, Mrs D. One was of the Sphinx in Egypt, another was the Oracle at Delphi and the last was the Colosseum in Rome. I still have them nearly 25 years later.

She put up with me all those hormonal years when I fell in love with so many Senior boys. She would understand on the days I didn’t turn up when I said I would, because I was behind the Home Ec building with Senior boys. She liked my friend Peter from Senior, who was called Fraggle because of his Robert Smith style hair. She sent me a card years later when he died of a heroin overdose, because he couldn’t face reality in life, being gay in a small town. She also tolerated my very camp friend Marcus, who wore pants so tight that he split them in the arse squatting down to give CPR to a dummy. Marcus who also didn’t know he was gay, but experimented with me behind the Home Ec block to find out if he liked girls.

She left when I went into Senior at high school and we had two teacher-librarians then, because they needed two to be as good as her. A man and a lady, who were nice, and let me stay a library monitor, but they didn’t talk to me about books or places around the world like Ms Scott/Whittaker did. They didn’t show me how to do new things in the library. They just wanted me to shelve and tidy up.

They let more people be library monitors, and some of them were boys. One of those boys was my boyfriend for a while, I can’t remember his name but he had blonde hair and a cute bum and liked to talk about books. He could also programme games into an Amstrad 464 computer, which we had. He would sit on the tennis courts of the school with me when things were shitty at home, and I would bolt to be out of the house. When we moved to another house to be away from my father, he came to visit me one Saturday morning, the first person who came to visit me at my house for a lot of years.

The library wasn’t the same after Ms Scott/Whittaker left. Then I was forced to change schools in Year 12 and went to Beaudesert, and the school librarian there was a dragon lady, who just screamed at the kids and made the library horrible. But I never forgot Miss Stubbs, Miss Browning, and Ms Scott/Whittaker.

Because of them, I’m a librarian. Because they showed me that no matter how screwed up my family and home was, I could always read and learn and dream about more. They told me that girls could put their mind to anything, and books were the doorway to that, even if the books were fluffy or silly.

They taught me that reading would always elevate me out of whatever pit I was in, be it depression, a violent home, being broke or lonely. They taught me that so long as I could read, life could be better, that it would be better. If people in books could sort it out, I could. Sometimes that lesson was all that got me through parts of my life.

I would love to be that person for someone. If my being a librarian contributes to one person raising themselves out of the shit in life to be something better than they thought they could be, or others thought they could be, then I’ve given something back to Miss Stubbs, Miss Browning, Ms Scott/Whittaker.

Three ladies that saved my life.

January 9, 2010. careers, experiences, family, high school, information, inspiration, librarians, libraries, memories, reading, Rosewood, teachers. 3 comments.

Why I Became a Librarian

A couple of days ago I was having a conversation with a friend about my boss and why I admire her, and I said something about “She reminds me of why I am a librarian and am passionate about libraries.” He asked me exactly why I am a librarian and as I thought of my answer, I decided that perhaps a blog post could come of that.

Photobucket

So…. why am I a librarian?
Well, when I was a little girl, the library was always a haven for me. It’s no secret that I come from a pretty screwed up family. Things at home were usually pretty crap. So when we used to go to the library of a night time. I think it was Tuesday nights the library was open late in Rosewood. We’d go in our pj’s and I had that whole building full of books at my fingertips, I was happy.
My school teacher-librarian when I was little was a lovely lady named Miss Stubbs. I thought she was amazing. She was pretty and had long straight blonde hair, and read books to kids at her job. She had a soft, clear voice and a sweet smile. And she was always really gentle and nice to me.
I remember her encouraging me to choose anything I wanted from the library to read. Even when I sometimes chose a book that was too young for me, or that I’d read time and time again, she never suggested I should choose something else. Sometimes she asked me what I liked about that particular book, and would offer something else that I might like for the same reasons. She was usually right.
When I returned books, she would ask me what I thought about it. She never judged me if I didn’t like something that she had recommended, or if I liked it for silly reasons, like it was funny or it had rude characters in it. I loved Roald Dahl’s books for the naughtiness of some of his characters. There was a Robyn Klein book called Penny Pollard’s Diary that looked like an exercise book and like it had bandaids and polaroids and stuff all stuck in it. It looked all dirty and Penny Pollard was a bit of a naughty girl. Miss Stubbs thought it was totally OK that I loved that book, even though my mother thought it was stupid.
Once there was a competition in the library to name the mascot for the reading programme. It was a little pink water dragon, kind of like the Loch Ness monster with humps up out of the water. I nominated the name “Serendipity” and won the competition. I got three books, one of which was a Pippi Longstocking book by Astrid Lindgren, and one of Enid Blyton’s Naughtiest Girl in School books. One day I will get that little dragon tattooed on me, along with the word Serendipity.
Miss Stubbs used to let me look in the box of new books first when they arrived, because I’d read pretty much everything in the library. I always remember it being like Christmas when those boxes would appear, it wasn’t very often from memory, but there were always new friends in that box for me.
Whenever things were really bad at home, there was always a book to escape into. I could hide in my wardrobe with a torch and read whatever library books I had. Sometimes I would find a corner down in our yard, far away from the house, where I could read or just daydream my own stories. There was a jacaranda tree I would climb up and read in too. When I was a little older, I would get on my bike and ride across town to my school and I would go to the library. If it was closed, I would sit on the sort of verandah outside in the shade and read there. It was always so peaceful and calm there, compared to at home.
Photobucket
A few years ago, I was standing in line at a Michael Palin booksigning, when I thought I recognised the lady in front of me. I couldn’t quite place where, but she turned and said to me “Excuse me, is your name Kathleen?” The minute she spoke, I recognised that soft, clear voice. It was Miss Stubbs. I was thrilled to tell her that I was now a librarian, and almost totally because of her. I found that she was still a children’s librarian in the area where I grew up, and still passionate about her job. I’m not quite sure she knows how much she meant to me, either then or now.
After Miss Stubbs left our school, I was a little older, and the new teacher-librarian came along. Her name was Miss Browning. She was really cool. She was more extroverted than Miss Stubbs, and had a fat red cattle dog called Bear that used to sleep around the library. Miss Browning let me help out at the library a lot. Especially when there were bullies around. I would shelve for her, or get things ready for her classes. She was always so funny, and I remember laughing with her while we talked. She taught me to cover and mend books, as well as how to catalogue. I already knew Dewey really well when I got to High School because of her. She gave me a t-shirt with sunglasses on it once, and I wore that thing to rags.
I often wonder what happened to her.
Once I got to High School, the librarian was Mrs Scott. Or Ms Whittaker. Or was that the other way around? Mrs Whittaker/Ms Scott. I remember she changed her name while we were there, because she got divorced. At first she really scared me, because while she was only a little lady and I was already my adult height, she had this ENORMOUS voice. She shouted at the boys a lot. Miss Stubbs and Miss Browning never shouted.
But one night I went to the library after school (again, they opened it one night per week to the public) and I asked her timidly if there were any books like the one I had read, The Root Cellar by Janet Lunn. You see I really loved the American Civil War setting, and wanted to read more about it. She gave me The Red Badge of Courage by Stephen Crane. We were firm friends from that day on.
She too would let me help in the library during lunch time and after school, mostly to keep away from the bullies and avoid going home. Later the school built a fantastic new library, state-of-the-art with one of the first fully automated barcoding systems in Australia. She bought badges for me and two other girls that said “Library Monitor”. Nobody had them before that. She taught us how to use the barcoding system, which had a pen shaped barcode reader. She taught me more about cataloguing and processing books. I could cover hardcover books with the thick plastic covering like a pro. I still can do it, beautifully neat and perfect.
Photobucket
And she encouraged me to read anything I could get my hands on. She had travelled a lot, and she told me about places she had been and things she had done, and gave me books to read about those places. Once she went on a big world trip and we had a substitute teacher-librarian. She sent me three postcards while she was away, to my house. I felt so special that she sent them to my house, not to the school like the ones she sent to the teacher’s aide that worked in the library, Mrs D. One was of the Sphinx in Egypt, another was the Oracle at Delphi and the last was the Colosseum in Rome. I still have them nearly 25 years later.
She put up with me all those hormonal years when I fell in love with so many Senior boys. She would understand on the days I didn’t turn up when I said I would, because I was behind the Home Ec building with Senior boys. She liked my friend Peter from Senior, who was called Fraggle because of his Robert Smith style hair. She sent me a card years later when he died of a heroin overdose, because he couldn’t face reality in life, being gay in a small town. She also tolerated my very camp friend Marcus, who wore pants so tight that he split them in the arse squatting down to give CPR to a dummy. Marcus who also didn’t know he was gay, but experimented with me behind the Home Ec block to find out if he liked girls.
She left when I went into Senior at high school and we had two teacher-librarians then, because they needed two to be as good as her. A man and a lady, who were nice, and let me stay a library monitor, but they didn’t talk to me about books or places around the world like Ms Scott/Whittaker did. They didn’t show me how to do new things in the library. They just wanted me to shelve and tidy up.
They let more people be library monitors, and some of them were boys. One of those boys was my boyfriend for a while, I can’t remember his name but he had blonde hair and a cute bum and liked to talk about books. He could also programme games into an Amstrad 464 computer, which we had. He would sit on the tennis courts of the school with me when things were shitty at home, and I would bolt to be out of the house. When we moved to another house to be away from my father, he came to visit me one Saturday morning, the first person who came to visit me at my house for a lot of years.
The library wasn’t the same after Ms Scott/Whittaker left. Then I was forced to change schools in Year 12 and went to Beaudesert, and the school librarian there was a dragon lady, who just screamed at the kids and made the library horrible. But I never forgot Miss Stubbs, Miss Browning, and Ms Scott/Whittaker.
Because of them, I’m a librarian. Because they showed me that no matter how screwed up my family and home was, I could always read and learn and dream about more. They told me that girls could put their mind to anything, and books were the doorway to that, even if the books were fluffy or silly. They taught me that reading would always elevate me out of whatever pit I was in, be it depression, a violent home, being broke or lonely. They taught me that so long as I could read, life could be better, that it would be better. If people in books could sort it out, I could. Sometimes that lesson was all that got me through parts of my life.
Photobucket
I would love to be that person for someone. If my being a librarian contributes to one person raising themselves out of the shit in life to be something better than they thought they could be, or others thought they could be, then I’ve given something back to Miss Stubbs, Miss Browning, Ms Scott/Whittaker.
Three ladies that saved my life.

September 14, 2009. high school, inspiration, librarians, libraries, primary school. Leave a comment.

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